National Leaders Gather To Consider Accord for “New Sustainablity” of the Gulf Coast

Executive Forum Seeks Balance with Climate, Energy & Coastal Issues

BATON ROUGE, LA – At the inaugural meeting of a new America’s Energy Coast (AEC) initiative, national and Gulf Coast leaders will conduct an executive forum to build cooperation toward sustainability. The program — to be convened on November 30 by the America’s WETLAND Foundation (AWF) in association with the Louisiana Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority (CPRA), the Department of Natural Resources, and Louisiana State University — is the latest regional effort by the AWF to establish the Gulf Coast energy-producing states as valued national assets recognized for energy and ecological sustainability.

“Forums in California, Florida, and New England have helped to bring a regional focus to issues of climate change, but no one has interlinked issues of sustainability with ecological, economic, and societal vulnerabilities and opportunities,’ said R. King Milling, chair of the America’s WETLAND Foundation and vice-chairman of Whitney National Bank.

The purpose of the new program is to ensure a stronger voice for the region through dialogue among representatives of government, industry, and non-governmental organizations (NGOs) from Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama. Continuing central issues for consideration are the dramatic wetland loss in the Gulf Coast region and the need for national recognition of linkages between coastal sustainability and domestic energy security.

“The Gulf states experienced success when we joined together as a unified voice supporting the sharing of federal oil and gas revenues from outer continental shelf production,” said former U.S. Senator John Breaux, who will moderate the roundtable discussion. “Where will America turn if we don’t sustain the resources that support this working coast? Wetland erosion threatens the vast network of infrastructure that supports maritime, energy, recreational, and cultural assets, and a national is needed, given the impact of the region on American trade and commerce,” Breaux continued.

The one-day Forum entitled, A New Sustainability for the Future of the Gulf Coast, is the first gathering of America’s Energy Coast Leadership and will convene leaders including H. Dale Hall, director of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; Mark Hurley, president of Shell Pipeline; Gerald E. Galloway, professor, Glenn L. Martin Institute, University of Maryland; Sean O’Keefe, chancellor of LSU; Randall Luthi, director of the U.S. Department of the Interior Minerals Management Service; and U.S. Senators Trent Lott (R-MS) and Mary Landrieu (D-LA), co-chairs of the America’s Energy Coast Honorary Leadership Council.

“Shell believes that protecting the U.S. Gulf Coast is vital to delivering future energy supplies to the nation. To succeed will require a collaborative effort on the parts of local, state, and federal governments, academic institutions, private enterprise, and the people who live and work in the communities along the Gulf Coast,” said Mark Hurley, President of Shell Pipeline and Chair of the America’s Energy Coast Industry Council. “As the world sponsor of America’s WETLAND, Shell is one of the strongest supporters of wetland initiatives and promoting awareness of coastal erosion. The AEC initiative is a progressive next step toward cooperation for a sustainable future.”

More than 140 policy leaders representing coastal constituencies in the four Gulf energy-producing states have joined the Honorary Leadership Council of the AEC, which will convene two forums annually to focus on policy and solutions, respectively. The group’s early work will build a consensus around principles for sustainability and will develop a cooperative accord with regard to policy and actions necessary for sustaining the Gulf Coast. Beyond elected and industry leaders, the project will convene leaders in science, engineering, academia, conservationists, community, and culture in its ongoing policy development, gathering of best practice models, and information dissemination.

“It is past time that we approach coastal sustainability concerns with regional cooperation,” said CPRA chair Sidney Coffee, who oversees the comprehensive Master Plan for restoring Louisiana’s coast. “We must build capacity to solve massive water resources and land issues here on the front lines. If these challenges are addressed properly, it will have worldwide significance.”

By: America’s WETLAND Foundation | 11.13.2007

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE November 13, 2007

CONTACT: Mary Lousteau: 202.387.8550 or ml@mcopr.com

NATIONAL LEADERS GATHER TO CONSIDER ACCORD FOR NEW SUSTAINABILITY OF THE GULF COAST

Executive Forum Seeks Balance with Climate, Energy & Coastal Issues

BATON ROUGE, LA – At the inaugural meeting of a new America’s Energy Coast (AEC) initiative, national and Gulf Coast leaders will conduct an executive forum to build cooperation toward sustainability. The program — to be convened on November 30 by the America’s WETLAND Foundation (AWF) in association with the Louisiana Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority (CPRA), the Department of Natural Resources, and Louisiana State University — is the latest regional effort by the AWF to establish the Gulf Coast energy-producing states as valued national assets recognized for energy and ecological sustainability.

“Forums in California, Florida, and New England have helped to bring a regional focus to issues of climate change, but no one has interlinked issues of sustainability with ecological, economic, and societal vulnerabilities and opportunities,’ said R. King Milling, chair of the America’s WETLAND Foundation and vice-chairman of Whitney National Bank.

The purpose of the new program is to ensure a stronger voice for the region through dialogue among representatives of government, industry, and non-governmental organizations (NGOs) from Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama. Continuing central issues for consideration are the dramatic wetland loss in the Gulf Coast region and the need for national recognition of linkages between coastal sustainability and domestic energy security.

“The Gulf states experienced success when we joined together as a unified voice supporting the sharing of federal oil and gas revenues from outer continental shelf production,” said former U.S. Senator John Breaux, who will moderate the roundtable discussion. “Where will America turn if we don’t sustain the resources that support this working coast? Wetland erosion threatens the vast network of infrastructure that supports maritime, energy, recreational, and cultural assets, and a national is needed, given the impact of the region on American trade and commerce,” Breaux continued.

The one-day Forum entitled, A New Sustainability for the Future of the Gulf Coast, is the first gathering of America’s Energy Coast Leadership and will convene leaders including H. Dale Hall, director of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; Mark Hurley, president of Shell Pipeline; Gerald E. Galloway, professor, Glenn L. Martin Institute, University of Maryland; Sean O’Keefe, chancellor of LSU; Randall Luthi, director of the U.S. Department of the Interior Minerals Management Service; and U.S. Senators Trent Lott (R-MS) and Mary Landrieu (D-LA), co-chairs of the America’s Energy Coast Honorary Leadership Council.

“Shell believes that protecting the U.S. Gulf Coast is vital to delivering future energy supplies to the nation. To succeed will require a collaborative effort on the parts of local, state, and federal governments, academic institutions, private enterprise, and the people who live and work in the communities along the Gulf Coast,” said Mark Hurley, President of Shell Pipeline and Chair of the America’s Energy Coast Industry Council. “As the world sponsor of America’s WETLAND, Shell is one of the strongest supporters of wetland initiatives and promoting awareness of coastal erosion. The AEC initiative is a progressive next step toward cooperation for a sustainable future.”

More than 140 policy leaders representing coastal constituencies in the four Gulf energy-producing states have joined the Honorary Leadership Council of the AEC, which will convene two forums annually to focus on policy and solutions, respectively. The group’s early work will build a consensus around principles for sustainability and will develop a cooperative accord with regard to policy and actions necessary for sustaining the Gulf Coast. Beyond elected and industry leaders, the project will convene leaders in science, engineering, academia, conservationists, community, and culture in its ongoing policy development, gathering of best practice models, and information dissemination.

“It is past time that we approach coastal sustainability concerns with regional cooperation,” said CPRA chair Sidney Coffee, who oversees the comprehensive Master Plan for restoring Louisiana’s coast. “We must build capacity to solve massive water resources and land issues here on the front lines. If these challenges are addressed properly, it will have worldwide significance.”